Fabric Postcards Make Fun Small Quilting Projects

Whether you want to use up bits of this and that in your studio, experiment with a new supply or technique, practice your free-motion stitching, or you’re just looking for something fun to quilt in a day, fabric postcards make great small quilting projects.

small quilting projects fabric postcards cheryl sleboda
Fabric postcards by Cheryl Sleboda, from the
Feb./March 2014 issue of Quilting Arts.

There are few rules when it comes to making these tiny, quick quilts. The finished size should be 4″ x 6″ and they should be relatively flat. You can mail them–just be sure to take them to your local post office to get the accurate postage and have the postcards hand cancelled.

Most fabric postcards consist of a decorative quilt top, a plain fabric backing, and batting made of fused felt, thin fusible fleece, or fusible interfacing. Use a zigzag stitch, satin stitch, or hand stitching to bind these small quilting wonders.

You can make these quick quilting projects even faster by making a large sandwich, stamping, painting, or fusing fabric over the top, and then slicing it up into 4″ x 6″ pieces. Then you just embellish and bind.

Here are some other ideas for decorating the small quilt top:

  • Free-motion stitching or sketching.
  • Stamping with acrylic paint or fabric paints.
  • Fabric collage.
  • Fused appliqué.
  • Mixed-media collage.
  • Embellishment with seed beads, sequins, lace, and trims.
  • Hand embroidery.
  • Photo transfers.

When you’ve finished your postcard, write your message and the recipient’s address with a permanent, fine-point marker. Then head to the post office to send your little masterpiece on its way.

You can’t make quilted projects much quicker than this. But you can get each issue of Quilting Arts Magazine more quickly with a digital subscription. Check out our digital options to see which works best for you.

P.S. Have you made fabric postcards? What techniques do you prefer? Leave your comment (and a link to your fabric postcard projects, if you have one) below.

Other topics you may enjoy:

Categories

Embellishing, Fabric Painting & Dyeing, Hand Embroidery, Quilting Daily Blog

8 thoughts on “Fabric Postcards Make Fun Small Quilting Projects

  1. I use Peltex II (the heaviest 2-sided fusible) for postcards…it is quite stiff and perfect for this purpose. Sometime miniature art quilts, sometimes just thread-sketching to enhance a lovely pattern on a batik….or, print an altered photo onto fabric, layer a piece of batting between the Peltex and the top layer and “carve” shape into the picture using invisible thread! Time to start making pet postcards for Houston ;)!

  2. I made a selection of fabric postcards last year and gave them to friends who were going on holiday to send them back to me. Once I received them back I wrote a book for my grandson which told him about the wonderful adventure the cards had been on . All in all the postcards had actually, in total, travelled more than three times round the world.
    I made the postcards from cotton I had bought in Egypty but as it had been lying in a box for quite a while I thought I would make the story round the fact that the fabric should go off on an adventure. Every card arrived back safely and totally undamaged

  3. I made a selection of fabric postcards last year and gave them to friends who were going on holiday to send them back to me. Once I received them back I wrote a book for my grandson which told him about the wonderful adventure the cards had been on . All in all the postcards had actually, in total, travelled more than three times round the world.
    I made the postcards from cotton I had bought in Egypty but as it had been lying in a box for quite a while I thought I would make the story round the fact that the fabric should go off on an adventure. Every card arrived back safely and totally undamaged

  4. I have made sent perhaps more than 100 fabric postcards and consistantly had the same problem. Nearly every time I approached the counter at the post office I was scolded and warned that fabric postcards were not legal to send through the mail. If I was not scolded, I was charged an exhorbitant postal rate for hand stamping, weight, etc. This happened in many places and states. In response, I still make fabric “postcards” but they now fit inside an envelope. I add regular postage to the envelope and drop them in the mail. It is a little disappointing, but better than being scolded on a regular basis.

  5. Does anyone know, offhand, if Canada Post still hand-cancels and would accept fabric
    postcards ? I would love to try this. Seems a great way to try new techniques without a
    huge investment in a large project.

Comment