Make a Mini Coin Purse and Other Quilted Bags

1 Jul 2013

From quilted tote bags to little purses, I'm kind of a sucker for handmade bags.

easy handmade coin purse
My mini coin purse.
Whether simply stitched or pieced and quilted, bag patterns come in many varieties. Once you find a couple of favorites, you can change the look and style just by changing the fabrics and embellishments.

One of the sweetest and easiest little bags I've made is this mini coin purse, based on a Japanese version I saw at Quilt Market last fall. I bought the purse frame at a chain sewing goods store.

Here's the shortened version of how to make a mini coin purse. If you want to quilt this bag, just layer a piece of lightweight batting with the outside fabric and free-motion stitch before cutting the pattern pieces.

1. Make a pattern: Place the frame on a piece of paper and trace the top profile, noting the center (where the clasp comes together) and the bottom of the frame. Continue drawing the exterior of the purse. Add a ¼" seam around the entire exterior of the pattern.

2. Cut out 2 pieces of fabric for the coin purse and 2 pieces for the lining using the pattern you just made. Be sure to transfer the marks from the pattern onto the fabric.

3. Place the outside fabric piece right sides together and sew around the bottom of the purse, from the points where the metal frame ends. Clip the curves and turn the piece right side out.

4. Place the lining fabric pieces right sides together. Mark a 2" opening at the bottom of the pieces. This will remain unsewn so you can turn the purse right side out. Sew from the 2" opening to the point where the metal frame ends on both sides of the lining. Clip the corners.

5. Pin the outside of the purse inside the lining, matching the top edges. Sew all the way around the top of the piece. Clip the corners.

6. Turn the piece right side out and push the lining inside the coin purse. Topstitch 1/8" from the edge around the seam you just made.

7. Slip the finished top of the purse inside the frame (it should fit perfectly!) and stitch or glue it in place.

I made a bunch of these little purses for Christmas gifts, and they're perfect for graduation gifts, too (especially if you tuck a little surprise inside).

You can get a kit for making a flex-frame coin purse, similar to the purse shown here, in the Quilting Daily shop.


P.S. My must-have bags are totes. I just can't have enough. We have patterns for quilted tote bags like the Modern Tote Bag  in the Quilting Daily Shop, or get a slew of patterns and instructions in our Craft Tree: Everyday Totes booklet.


Featured Products

Flex Frame Coin Purse

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Was: $3.99
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Pattern

Create a charming coin purse and personalize with embroidery!

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Modern Tote Bag

Availability: In Stock
Was: $4.99
Sale: $2.50

Pattern

This stylish tote bag is perfect for carrying your laptop, files, folders, or even a knitting project.

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Comments

Kater-Tot wrote
on 6 Jul 2013 9:26 AM

How do I "sew" the purse into the little metal frame?  I've only TRIED to achieve this from an expensive kit bought from the Japanese Woman who does incredible coin purses, and larger, awesome bags, online.  It was special glue and the supposed to hold the fabric inside the little 'track' and I think pinch it closed.  FAILURE.  Also, when in the instructions did you slip stitch closed the little opening in the lining?

Thanks for any help,

Kate

Sharon569 wrote
on 6 Jul 2013 12:39 PM

I would like to know how to sew it in there?

Sharon569 wrote
on 6 Jul 2013 12:40 PM

I would like to know how to sew it in there?

TheaM@2 wrote
on 7 Jul 2013 6:04 AM

these little purse frames come in two types - either the glue-in/pinch closed type or the kind that are perforated for sewing.  If the purse frame you have does not have holes along the edge, you have a glue-in type = use E6000 with a skewer to push the fabric firmly into the frame.

I like the sew in kind, altho it is a little time consuming to hand sew the bag into the frame.  I use a 'heaving duty' matching or coordinating thread color.