"Steam a Seam 2 and paintI

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13Dandelions wrote
on 3 Jun 2009 3:55 PM

I saw a beautiful vest in my local fabric shop that looked like it was appliqued or painted. I found out that the artist used  Steam a Seam 2. As far as I could tell the Steam a Seam was painted, the ironed onto organza. Then the organza was laid over a base fabric, and then the design elements were embellished with machine stitching and beading. (I'd like to post the pix but I don't know the artist or have permission). 

Has anyone used this technique? I am confused because the SAS2 has paper on both sides. Do you paint the sticky side? 

The finished product on the organza looks just like it was silk-screened. its a very beautiful technique. I havn't been able to find directions for anything similar by googling. Lots of stuff on fabric to fabric, but not painting on the SAS2. I appreciate information from anyone who has used this technique.

Maybe a QA article!!!!!!

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 3 Jun 2009 5:34 PM

Hi SunniH - While I have not used the SAS2, I have used MistyFuse which does not have the paper backing. I made a 'wadded" ball of MistyFuse and dipped the ball in Lumiere Halo Blue/Gold paint and let it dry flat. Then I fused the layers as follows:

Ironing board, parchment, backing fabric, MistyFuse, organza, parchment paper. It worked very well and I was pleased with the results.

You might try removing one of the pieces of paper before painting. Keep the removed paper to use when you fuse. Does this confuse???!

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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13Dandelions wrote
on 4 Jun 2009 1:26 PM

Thanks for the reply. 

I think I get what you mean. Is what you end up with - the backing fabric and the organza fused together with the misty fuse design melted in between?

This is close. What I want to get to is the organza alone with the painted SAS2 (or misty fuse) design melted into the organza alone. So,  maybe ironing board, parchment, organza, painted misty fuse (or SAS2) and parchment.

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reginabdunn wrote
on 4 Jun 2009 5:54 PM

Don't forget, though, that if the Misty Fuse or SAS2 is exposed (as opposed to being between layers of fabric), it will still stick to anything if it is heated. So avoid heating your finished piece or it will fuse to anything it touches.

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 4 Jun 2009 8:39 PM

Exactly what I would suggest - play, frolic, experiment! That's why I signed up on this site - for the pure enjoyment of trying something new - the What-if factor!

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 4 Jun 2009 8:40 PM

Exactly! Get a big roll of baking parchment! It is one item that comes in handy for many things!

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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pandabolt wrote
on 5 Jun 2009 12:32 PM

I have painted various fusibles with great success. And, yes, you remove one of the protective papers to paint the adhesive itself.

Yes, you definitely have to have some caution when using it.  If you do not have it covered with another fabric, then any time you hit it with an iron, it will gunk up your iron, and distress as well.

I think you should go with what you think was done, and you will probably be pleasantly surprised.

Try using Angelina fibers and snippets of angelina film as well.  And I have found that using PearlEx on top of the exposed fusible is just wonderful.

If you fuse the organza on top of the painted fusible, you might consider just what effect you want.  Misty fuse is quite lacey, so you would get a softer result than if you use a more "solid" fusible such as the SAS.  The color will probably be more brilliant, and thus more apparent once it is layered with the sheer.

Incidentally, I rusted some Misty Fuse, and boy did that do some great things.  Try it, you might like it.!

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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13Dandelions wrote
on 5 Jun 2009 3:29 PM

The effect I am trying for looks like silk screen on organza. I like the suggestion of misty fuse, I've never tried it. I also like the rust idea. I just bought the SAS on  a whim. I think I'll go out and get the Misty fuse. Thanks for the input 

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pandabolt wrote
on 5 Jun 2009 9:18 PM

Sunni, is it possible that the organza was printed on, and then just fused to the base using Steam A Seam?  Printed organza looks pretty ethereal.

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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BrendaF@17 wrote
on 27 Jun 2009 5:42 AM

SunniH,

I also recently saw a wall hanging at a store in Sacramento J.R. Flamingo using this technique. I asked the store owner if it was fused organza and she said it was actually Lumiere Paint painted on SAS, then the shapes were cut out and fused. I was out of town and really should have paid more attention. A class was being offered but being from out of town, it wasn't an option at that time. But anyway, doing a web search with these details I found this article on the technique. Here it is http://www.americaquiltscreatively.com/episodes/704.pdf I recently bought the paint and was going to give it a try. The wall hanging used cut-out shapes from the painted SAS and embellished with embroidery and beads. Very elegant. If I remember correctly, it might have been fused on Dupioni Silk or raw silk. Very unique and different. Hope this helps.

BrenFer

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13Dandelions wrote
on 29 Jun 2009 4:22 PM

Thank you for the reply- that's where I saw the wall hanging too. I loved it. Thank you for the link, it's exactly what I was looking for. 

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Marithebeth wrote
on 29 Jun 2009 6:21 PM

It is fortunate that you saw this vest and fell in love with it. This sounds intriguing. I am trying to remember where I put my SAS! You have triggered plenty of ideas. What if you used colored organza? What if you painted leaves and placed them face down on the SAS, brayed them and removed the leaves? Two kinds of paint? Something watery and then some thicker paint done with a secondary pattern? And I'm just learning what I can do with Angelina. Adding that into the fray could be fun, fun, fun. Thanks for the ideas.

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 29 Jun 2009 6:29 PM

Hi Maribeth - I must have been mind-melding with you today! As I was outside pulling weeds and admiring the trees I was thinking along the same lines. However, home renos have pushed artsy-quilty stuff to the very back of the bus lately and I look forward to seeing what YOU come up with since I will soon be covering my sewing machine, computer and printers to protect them from sanding dust! I will, however, be taking my laptop outside in the fresh air so I can keep up!

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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cindyl57 wrote
on 30 Jun 2009 1:12 PM

I was excited to try painting on Steam a Seam after reading this forum topic. I tried a little sample. I painted the SAS with metallic gold Lumiere paint and sandwiched it between a scrap piece of fabric and tulle (using my teflon pressing sheet of course!). Here's a picture. It turned out really cool looking and I love the texture of the tulle on top of the paint. So much fun to discover a new technique ... thanks for sharing ideas everyone!

 

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Karen99 wrote
on 1 Jul 2009 7:16 AM

I'm confused -- I looked at the instructions on the link to America Quilts creatively and do you fuse the web with the paint side TOWARD your fabric?  Or is the the web side on the fabric?

 

I'm going to paint some web today and try it --Karen S

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