shaving creme marbling

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caren12 wrote
on 30 Jun 2009 10:39 AM

Ya'll were right trying to paint with shells was not a great idea!! Although they do make very good stamps!  Not a total failure I did learn something.

New paint questions.  I tried shaving creme marbling today.  (It is still hanging outside to dry)  If someone has tried this method before I have a few questions.  1) I tried to scrape the excess creme off, but of course it was impossible to get it all off.  Well that mess up the finished product?  2)  I used dye-na-flow paints, for future reference how do you clean brushes after use?  3) How long should it dry before I heat set it?  4) After heat setting it, if I wanted to sun paint the same fabric,  will the processes cooperate?

It looks pretty cool right now, I ended up throwing a lot of used creme away for lack of drying space!

Thanks for reading

Caren

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marti13 wrote
on 30 Jun 2009 12:01 PM

Hi Caren,

I have never gotten around to trying the various shaving cream/paint or shaving cream/dye methods.  I found two articles (out of many) to share with you.


Shaving cream with paint (PDF file):  http://twocreativestudios.com/freeprojects/shave.pdf

Shaving cream with fabric dye:  http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/1498922-AA.shtml

 

One or both may help with learning the best way to do the process.

Have fun!!!!!

 

 

 

Marti in Houston, Texas

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on 30 Jun 2009 2:42 PM

caren:

1) I tried to scrape the excess creme off, but of course it was impossible to get it all off.  Well that mess up the finished product?

No, it shouldn't have an effect on it, though sometimes the pigment can migrate and give the fabric a bit of a faint tint.

caren:
2)  I used dye-na-flow paints, for future reference how do you clean brushes after use?

Dye-na-flow is a water-soluable acrylic fabric paint, so it behaves much like regular acrylic paints when it comes to cleaning up. You can clean your brushes with cool water and mild soap.

caren:
3) How long should it dry before I heat set it?

You can iron it as soon as it's fully dry, but I've even heat-set with an iron by pressing painted fabric that's still a little damp.

caren:
4) After heat setting it, if I wanted to sun paint the same fabric,  will the processes cooperate?

Yes.

caren:
It looks pretty cool right now, I ended up throwing a lot of used creme away for lack of drying space!

Photos pretty please? :D

 

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Posts 133
on 30 Jun 2009 3:13 PM

What did you use to scrape the cream off?  I usually use a stiff piece of card (cardboard box) and slide that across.  You don't need to push the paper/fabric into the cream too far, just as long as there's contact across the piece.

I don't do marbling very often, so for me, its an easy cheap way to do it - without buying all the "proper" paints and bits.

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caren12 wrote
on 1 Jul 2009 9:31 AM

Thanks for your reply.

I used a piece of cardboard for one piece and then on others an old wooden school ruler.  That actually seemed to work best for me.  I just heat set my fabric and then washed it in the sink with soap and water.  But I noticed some of the paint, where it was really heavy, is coming of in tiny little pieces almost like when you use a pencil eraser.  So I threw it in the washer for about 5 minutes and then in the dryer.  There are still a few places that look like an eraser has been after it, but over all it looks good.  I assume this happened because I used muslin, a nice heavy muslin, and not pretreated fabric for dyeing.  But on the final piece I also used plain muslin, but the shavin cream had gotten almost to one color.  This piece looks beautiful, there is little swirling, but great color saturation.  It was also a thinner muslin.

Thanks for your help.

Caren

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Posts 227
caren12 wrote
on 2 Jul 2009 9:16 AM

I have pictures of the marbling.

The top one was my first attempt, it has very heavy paint.

 

The middle picture was my 2nd attempt and my favorite.  There are still some heavy spots but it looks nice.

This was my final attempt.   Later I sun printed it for use as abackground.

Thanks for your help.  Caren

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Posts 469
on 2 Jul 2009 10:25 AM

Don't you just love the color colbinations and patterns you can get? The firs time I'd ever seen anyone marble something, my heart started doing triple-time and I knew I had to learn how to do that! How did the sun printing do, did it show up clearly?

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Posts 227
caren12 wrote
on 2 Jul 2009 1:33 PM

yes, Ilove the marbling- all those swirls.  What I really enjoy is you never know what you will get.  The sun printing worked well.  I posted a picture of it with my fish shape.  That will be the background.

Caren 

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on 2 Jul 2009 2:11 PM

Great stuff, Caren.  I've had the shaving creme for two years, just haven't gotten around to it.  I just printed out the pages from Marti's link and I have a question.  How long did you leave the fabric on the creme?  In the instructions on the first link from Two Creative Studios it says she left it on for 12 hours.  She's using silk, I will be using cotton, but I was under the impression that you could do a couple of sheets in sequence quite quickly.

I love your second piece.  I also like the shell effect in the third.

 

kathleen

Kathleen

 

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Quilnan wrote
on 3 Jul 2009 7:18 AM

Caren- Your efforts with marbling look good. A demonstrator at a recent Sewing Expo used shaving cream for a silk screen project. She mentioned that it is not necessary to scrape off the excess cream as it evaporates in time. There is a residue of filminess left behind which comes off after heat setting (between sheets of parchment paper) and when you wash the piece. So maybe you can try that and leave the surface undisturbed until the cream disappears and it's ready for heat setting. Happy 4th. 

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on 11 Oct 2009 5:51 AM

My granddaughter and I did 8 pieces on Friday - cloth and paper - and decided that we are definitely adding this to our list of ways to make the fabric we want.  I was pleasantly surprised that at the end, there was almost no dye left in the shaving creme.  My one recommendation would be to buy shaving creme that doesn't have a strong scent, and make sure that you're not allergic to the scent it has!  Lots of sneezing going on, and the workroom still smells of the stuff.

Kathleen

 

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