Cracked Paper Quilts

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carolwiebe wrote
on 9 Jul 2009 5:32 AM

I wrote the article Cracked Paper Quilts for Quilting Arts, issue 39. I have just made a video (my first!) which shows how I piece and appliqué the top for a paper quilt.

Hopefully this will be useful to readers of the article.

Carpe diem!

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Muppin wrote
on 9 Jul 2009 6:13 AM

Carol, It's awesome!  Congrats.  If I weren't working right now, I'd run out and try it!

Cheryl / Muppin

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carolwiebe wrote
on 9 Jul 2009 8:39 AM

Thanks, Muppin! I'd love to see your results.

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on 10 Jul 2009 2:59 AM

Thank you Carol for that.  I'd not read the article (behind with my mag reading) so went immediately for a look.  I'm so pleased to find someone else who likes stitching on paper as much as I do.  Love the title of cracked Paper Quilts too.

Have you tried scrunching the paper and unfolding and scrunching - I see the article said a little about it, but if you do it a lot, you can turn a paper into a very soft fabric like structure.  I also like oiled papers - you can do the scrunching technique with oil on your hands (any, baby oil, cooking oil, linseed oil) and I like just painting oil on papers - takes a while to dry out and can be a bit smelly, but it turns the paper into a whole new look.

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carolwiebe wrote
on 10 Jul 2009 4:03 AM

Thanks for the suggestions! I have done the crumpled paper technique, and you are right, it softens the fibres considerably! It also ends up looking more batik-y when you paint it, because of all the tiny creases in the paper.

I have not tried putting oil on paper. I assume that it accepts paint just fine after the oil has dried?

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on 10 Jul 2009 4:16 AM

I think you might need to paint it first with something like watercolour, if you want a colour on it.  However just painting on the oil changes the colour of the paper and makes it translucent - almost like proper animal skin parchment/vellum.

  I hope this isn't too large for the forum - but this is a close up of a folded book made with oiled wallpaper lining paper.  Its a long folded "book" which is then in turn stitched onto clear acetate pages - but hopefully you can see how the paper becomes more translucent.

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on 10 Jul 2009 8:17 AM

Carol, I loved the article and I wated the vid yesterday... left me wanting more LOL. SUCH a cool technique. My first love is paper and I love stitching into it, too.

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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carolwiebe wrote
on 10 Jul 2009 8:41 AM

Thanks, Judi! I went to your blog and really like the Hello post, writing as one greedy artist to another. You are doing some amazing art. Congratulations on your achievement of such a body of work!

I decided that I would explore the Cracked Paper Quilt method in depth because I also am in love with stitching on paper. it is very different than on cloth, and the paper accepts mixed media techniques differently. I am more of a painter than a dyer: I am wild about moving paint around with brushes and just about anything else that I grab. I also love painting with my hands. It is so tactile and fingers can do things brushes cannot!

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on 10 Jul 2009 12:31 PM

Carol, you are speaking my language! My ultimate goal is to use paper and fabric interchangeably in my quilting... and it's for the reasons you state- that paper takes media so differently. I am terribly passionate about paper. One large sheet of linen finish card stock can make my heart skip a beat. LOL

Thanks for visiting my blog and for the nice things you said! :D

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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on 11 Jul 2009 9:29 AM

Oh Carol, on the video you had a little struggle opening your pot of Golden.  Here's a tip.....  put a smidge of Vaseline/petroleum jelly around the thread of jars and it will stop them sticking, especially things like gesso, where you can need a crowbar to open it.  One warning, Vaseline and rubber don't mix, it will make the rubber perish, so as long as you don't have that type of seal on a pot (or the dropper type bottles) you can use it on the plastic pots or glass jars.

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carolwiebe wrote
on 11 Jul 2009 11:39 AM

Wasn't that hilarious? In my mind I'm thinking, "Why didn't I pre-open the jar?" and then a split second reply came of, "Everyone has done this. It's OK!"

I know about the vaseline, but have never done it. Perhaps my mind needs a little vaseline . . .

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pandabolt wrote
on 13 Jul 2009 9:15 AM

Carol, thank yo so much for your video.  I had read the article, and was interested, but it just seemed to have some blanks in the process for me.  ( I think I would have liked seeing a bit more of the step-by step photos)  At any rate, your video prompted me to go back and re-read the article, and now it makes much more sense.

I am hoping that you will produce a couple more videos:  I would like to see where you went from the last video with the piece you were working on---the diversity of the background is intriguing to me....where will you go now on that one?

I'd also love seeing the initial tacking down (grid) of the quilt sandwich as well as the cutting apart and stitching the ladder to create the cracks.  And the final steps of painting.  Or is the paper used basically as a substrate for other additions?

And, are you nuts????? LOL   You actually use sewing thead to crochet around a quilt?  What a gal you are!

On second thought, maybe I shouldn't have any of these videos....maybe I should just wing it and see what happens. I'm thinking a layer of wax as a final layer would be interesting.

I am now intrigued enough to want to play with this some more.  I have an assignment from my art group to make my own stamps.  Maybe I'll create my paper that way for starters!

Gotta love this new community.  I no longer feel so alone with my "out there" ideas.  It's wonderful to have soul mates.

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 13 Jul 2009 9:34 AM

Great  article and video. I had already done a bit of experimenting after reading your article. Now I am fascinated by the technique. I'm going out to take pictures of some barn wood so I can experiment some more. 

When's the next video going to be out? In a few minutes??? (LOL)

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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carolwiebe wrote
on 13 Jul 2009 12:29 PM

I love your "from the gut" response. I don't think I am nuts, but if I was, I probably wouldn't know it!

I am so happy to hear that you are intrigued enough to play with this . . . I have found it to be a very satisfying way to work on many levels. I discovered that I actually enjoy working with paint, medium, pastels, pencil crayons, painstiks, etc. more than I do piecing fabric and employing traditional applique work. I wanted "quilts" that supported collage, and stamping and all those other fabulous mixed media on paper techniques. I loved the leathery feel of the surfaces after I had applied these (and other) materials. And I loved the freedom of cutting up these pieces any way I liked. I still do, quite a few Cracked Paper Quilts later!!

I am definitely making more videos: I am planning to offer them in an online Cracked Paper Quilt class  on my Ning Network. You sound like just the sort of soul mate I would love to have take part! Even if you decided not to take a class, experimentation and play increase exponentially when creative minds put their ideas together, I find!

PS-The gret thing about using the sewing thread for crocheting is that it matches the sewn lines perfectly, and takes the paint the same way. I do put 2 spools in a jar and use two threads at once, so I am not completely bonkers!

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carolwiebe wrote
on 13 Jul 2009 12:53 PM

Kathryn, that's exactly how I felt when I first started making quilts this way: totally fascinated! And I am always excited by other artist's approaches to their work. We are doing art because we have something to share, and the sharing part is as fabulous as the making part. Our techniques, our materials, our thoughts, our insights--these are all facets of art making that I find irresistible.

I am definitely making more videos: I am planning to offer them in online Cracked Paper Quilt classes  on my Ning Network. Check us out--you have the kind of mind I enjoy interacting with: one that likes to experiment and that enjoys getting fascinated.

Of course, letting yourself get fascinated by art has its repercussions. Your life gets taken over by creativity. Your holidays turn into art retreats. Your house and hands are never really clean again (if they ever were).

I know you understand all this. I read your bio.

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