Quilting or Threadpainting, one in the same or different....

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on 25 Aug 2009 9:00 AM

Does everyone or anyone agree that thread painting and quilting are one in the same, or are they different applications?

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Muppin wrote
on 25 Aug 2009 10:00 AM

I don't agree that these are the same.  Threadpainting can be a very heavy application of threadwork that you do before quilting, especially if you need to stabilize the fabric.  I have seen threadpaining designs cut out from it's stabilizer and "appliqued" to a background and then quilted.

Some people consider "accenting" a motif with quilting in various complimentary colors "threadpainting", but I do not.

YMMV, however! :)

Cheryl / Muppin

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Muppin wrote
on 25 Aug 2009 10:02 AM

I moved this topic from the Help forum since it's really more of a general quilting question.

Thanks,

Cheryl / Muppin

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on 25 Aug 2009 11:19 AM

I agree with Muppin, two very different things.  I'm working on a piece (well, if I'd actually do some stitching on it I could really say I'm working on it) that has a tree thread painted up the middle, then quilted around the tree.  there will be quilted leaves (as soon as I actually work on it) around the tree.  I did the thread painted tree before I put the quilt sandwich together.  I used a piece of muslin as backing to stabilize the thread work - I've not had good luck with stabilizer and the piece is 45''x24'' with the tree taking up the length and much of the width in some fashion.  After I had the thread painting done, I put the batt and backing on and quilted around the tree to hold it together.

Kathleen

 

gallery

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on 25 Aug 2009 12:31 PM

I will somewhat agree with you, but threadwork and threadpainting throw me.  Threadpainting, used as decoration, I will agree, but if you have a large piece with a lot or threadwork, then at some point you need to quilt among the work to hold your fabric and thread down so they do not sag when hung.  Although some quilts (summer ones) do not have any batting, once you make the sandwich I call it quilting.  When doing a portrait, I find both are needed, but the quilting is what gives it the depth as there are two extra layers for dimension.

Atleast this got people talking!~

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sha1non wrote
on 25 Aug 2009 2:40 PM

I think threadpainting implies a more creative process than quilting.  However, I have a bargello quilt that is both. I've free motioned leaves over the whole quilt and the results are both.  I do threadpaint directly on to my background-usually smaller simpler motifs.  I use stabilizer and applique when the design is larger or may need some "tweaking."  Or when I'm attached to my background and need more control than free motioning it would give.

Anyway we define the process it's exciting and encourages me to push to my edge creatively.

Sha1non

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on 25 Aug 2009 4:49 PM

I am a machine quilter by trade, and some quilts require lots of intricate quilting, some larger, such as leaves, pebbles, even meandering or stippling can be different sizes. 

How very true, "Anyway we define the process it's exciting and encourages (all of us) to be pushed over the edge creatively".  You hit the nail right square on the head!

I am a QUILTER!

Thanks,

CQ

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on 26 Aug 2009 7:12 AM

HI Cotonwood Quilter, I am certain I could NOT be a quilter (too much cleverness involved there) but I do believe what I do is thread painting. You may like to look at my work on my web site http://www.threadart.org   I haven't done much in the way of quilts, but find myself wanting to go in that direction more, as putting pictures in frames is a bit limiting.  I suppose every thing we do evolves with all the inspiration and circumstances that influence us.  I wonder if quilting becomes thread painting when the amount of thread detail becomes more than holding the layers together.  Good question, certainly gets us all thinking:)  Barb.

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Quilnan wrote
on 26 Aug 2009 11:10 AM

Barb, your work is lovely!! Thanks for the link. I just borrowed a book from our local library and may want to get my own copy I enjoyed it so much... it's Ann Fahl's "Coloring with Thread". She makes a distinction between the two techniques you mention, noting that thread painting is free-motion machine embroidery done to decorate or embellish the surface of cloth. Because it is done on the surface of the fabric using stablizer behind, the stitches will not go through three layers of a quilt and be seen on the back. In this way it differs from machine quilting. Machine quilting can also decorate, accent, and embellish the fabric surface but would be done thru three layers and stitches would be seen on the back. Her explanation made sense to me. The book had some simple practice exercises and small projects with excellent instruction to master her methods. And plenty of inspiring photos. Nancy

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on 26 Aug 2009 11:37 AM

Hi Barb, thanks for your comments and discussion.  First off, your Thread art is beautiful, such attention to detail.  You should be proud of your work, and I would call you the Clever One with all that you do.  Am not sure if the fact you put your work in a frame or hang it on a wall makes it a quilt or a picture???  Another good question.  Wonder as well if the quilting becomes thread painting when the amount of thread is considered, also, does it matter that there is usually many colors when thread painting or quilting?  Another good discussion.  When we mention holding layers together, at what point does it move from embroidery, applique or quilting?  After reading all the chatter, I am sticking with "the answer is in the mouth of the beholder". 

Thanks again for sharing and I will watch to see when you make your first piece that you will call a "Quilt".

Cottonwood Quilter (Linda)

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on 27 Aug 2009 1:23 AM

Yes! Nancy, directing us to the explanation from Ann Fahl's book sounds perfect to me!! She certainly puts the idea into words much more clearly than I can!  Thanks for the info on the book.  I will go in search for it too.  I also love the work by Alison Holt.  So much fun, so little time...... Hmmmm........!     Barb.

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on 27 Aug 2009 1:46 AM

Hi Linda, thanks for your kind comments on my work.  I had a look at yours too and it is magic! Perhaps we are trying to define the indefinable, but I think Nancy's post refering to Ann Fahl's book and explaination seems logical to me.  There are no rules about being creative, otherwise no one would ever do anything new and exciting.  We would all just be repeating the same sort of thing, not pushing and stretching the boundaries and well, just being creative!  Barb.

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on 27 Aug 2009 5:51 AM

I think as a person from the embroidery world, that the difference is in its purpose, and more particularly its primary purpose.

Thread painting/free machine embroidery as I would call it, is primarily a decorative effect, if it joins layers together than that's secondary.  Likewise quilting, of course it is decorative, but its primary purpose is tp hold layers together.

I think anything goes for anything, unless of course your making for competitions/events then you need to be really sure your work fits the categories/guidelines.

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on 27 Aug 2009 6:26 AM

This is something I have not considered, but will be looking into, as have piece for an on-line challenge.  Will definitely have to research the competition for their category definition, that will of course be the deciding factor.  Would hate to be disqualified due to misinterpretation.

Thanks for your the eye opener,

Cottonwood Quilter

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