UK members..is there a source book for City and Guilds course in embroidery??

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Lorraine62 wrote
on 8 Dec 2009 4:27 PM

I cant afford the online City and Guilds Courses and no colleges near me offer the course at a time that doesnt clash with the school run.  I was just wondering if anyone knows if there is a course book that I can buy and follow whicht covers what is done on a City and Guilds course..At the moment I just teach myself from books, blogs like this etc

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Stitchminx wrote
on 8 Dec 2009 5:21 PM

Hi Lorraine, I don't think that there is a C&G coursebook available as normally the coursework is down to the Lecturers!  What I'd recommend you do is have a look at the Embroiderers' Guild here in the UK.  Find yourself a local Branch to join and have fun learning without the expense of a course.

Have fun whatever you look at, enjoy stitching!

Regards, Stitchminx aka Jane in Scotland

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Posts 133
on 9 Dec 2009 8:57 AM

Hi Lorraine

As far as I'm aware there isn't a course book for C&G.  Basically the course has set criteria, and its down to each college how they teach that to meet the requirements, so you get huge variation from one college to another anyway.  For instance a friend did cold water dyeing and dyeing from natural products - at my college, we did cold water, disperse and acid dyeing.  I did the course some years back, and the C&G syllabus has changed at least 6 times to my knowledge.

Any technique you can think of is easily available to you in books, via the web, forums, discussion groups, indcluding design.  You can buy dvds, or find techniques on YouTube.  What you miss from a class is the companionship and ability to discuss in person, and perhaps the nagging to get on with it, meet deadlines.  But doing it yourself also brings a freedom, there's no restriction because "miss" won't approve - and if a technique takes your fancy you can spend a lot longer exploring it, whereas with college you've got to meet criteria and time restraints.

Don't just look to the embroidery world for your ideas or techniques.  Lots of skills overflow from one genre to another - sometimes they get called another name.  Lots of products get taken from their original purpose and used in a different way - for instance Tyvek and Lutradur.  So experiment and have fun.

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Lorraine62 wrote
on 9 Dec 2009 3:04 PM

Thanks so much for replying with your helpful advice.  I have realised that I am not the type who likes to be constrained by meeting college criteria and deadlines but likes to explore different avenues eg burning lutradur & organza, freestyle, mixed media, painting. felting etc.  I have never thought of contacting the embroiders guild might try that in the new year once I am up to scratch with embroidery! I quite like their Stitch magazine which provides lots of inspiration. Thanks again for providing ideas for the direction I should follow

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Posts 133
on 9 Dec 2009 3:28 PM

Lorraine, I've been a Member of the Embroiderers' Guild for many years.  Each Branch is different... but we always say we don't ask that anyone can stitch!!  All you need is an interest.... and don't forget embroidery is a very wide remit., we cover everthing from historical, cultural, to specific techniques.   Guild is just a term, not a measure of competence.  EG's half year membership starts 1st March, btw.   I don't take Stitch, which has projects in it - but I have taken the original EG magazine Embroidery, for many years.  Its articles about all sorts of things from the embroidery world, but no how to things, a sort of UK version of Fiberarts, which I also take.

I'm not a member but the UK also has a Quilters Guild.... the lines between embroidery and quilting get ever closer, and plenty of techniques cross over so you might want to look there too.

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