What's the most unusual tool in your quilting arsenal?

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pandabolt wrote
on 3 May 2009 7:48 PM

I use a lot of blue painter's tape.  It works well for delineating straight lines; it holds things in place. I always use it when I am mitering borders. 

I am also a longarm quilter, and I use the tape for channel quilting; and it works wonderfully for marking a spot that may need more attention such as fullness, or a popped seam etc.  It's kind of like using a highlighter.

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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on 6 May 2009 9:31 AM

I keep a box of baby wipes in the studio - they're great for getting ink and paint of your hands as well as off my silkscreens and rubber stamps.    I keep a few unused dryer sheets for cleaning off the sole plate of my iron for those time when I accidentally get some mistyfuse on it.

Sue Bleiweiss

http://www.suebleiweiss.com

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Jamie Fingal wrote
on 6 May 2009 10:04 AM

One of my favorite tools is the Bedazzler for, get this, stud setting.  This is something that you want to be very careful about when you are trying to find one to buy on-line.  Stud setter - all kinds of fun things come up on the web.  All that aside, It is the quickest and easiest tool for attaching studs onto a quilt or apron that I have used.  And it's good excercise for your upper arms.  I would advise not trying to set 100+ studs in one sitting though. 

Jamie Fingal

http://JamieFingalDesigns.blogspot.com/

http://www.JamieFingal.com/

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Posts 43
on 6 May 2009 4:33 PM

I keep a lint roller handy with the sticky disposable sheets.  Because I have cats it helps remove the stray hair from my projects but it also works great when you are working with an extremely fuzzy or linty fabric or eyelash yarn that sheds after cutting it.  I simply roll the lint roller over my cutting mat, ironing board or work surface and "poof" it's clean.

Terri Stegmiller, Mandan, ND
www.terristegmiller.com

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Posts 63
Barbm12 wrote
on 6 May 2009 4:37 PM

I am not sure about this one if it counts.  I have been making cold forged copper hangers for my quilts using refrigerator tubing, a large hammer and anvil.

Barbara

http://craftgate.com/blog/BarbaraMatthiessen

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bdconsultant wrote
on 6 May 2009 6:16 PM

Stainless steel chop sticks for smoothing out turned inside out corners.

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 6 May 2009 6:52 PM

I use painter's tape for marking too - but I also use it wrapped sticky-side out around my hand like a lint roller to clean cat fur off my work, floor and ironing board. I also use my long, thin pointy tweezers a lot.

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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Posts 469
on 7 May 2009 7:29 AM

A gigantic piece of cardboard that I've covered with duct tape and plastic garbage bags. I use this to paint/dye large pieces of fabric. The best part is that once the painting is done, if I need the piece to lay flat to dry but not take up my whole workspace, I can pick it up and move it. Afterwards, when the fabric is dry, the boards can be wiped down with a damp cloth to remove any dye or paint residue. The added bonus is that quite often, the little wipes I use to clean it with pick up fabulous color and can be reused in another piece of work.

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Posts 469
on 7 May 2009 7:31 AM

Sybil said:

"My bottle of aloe vera that I use to keep inks from spreading.  It is the one thing that most people who come into my sewing room will ask about.    I listen to my Farscape dvds while I sew.  I am a sci fi geek as well as a quilter.  My two obsessions:Farscape and quilting.

Sybil"

 

Your what to do what? This is totally new to me, can you explain how you use aloe vera to keep inks from spreading? I'm fascinated!

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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jckirner wrote
on 7 May 2009 8:02 AM

I do a similar thing! Although it's old foam core boards stuffed inside plastic garbage bags in my case, since I tend to work small.

I like how I can pin my items to the foam core as they go from wet to damp and then the piece can go vertical to dry - saving counter space.

I also use clothespins with old sewing spools glued on top which I clip to the corners of the foam core - now I can stack several pieces vertically to create more drying space. (did that make sense?)

Jackie K.

blissfullyimperfect.blogspot.com

www.flickr.com/photos/jckirner

 

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Posts 99
pandabolt wrote
on 7 May 2009 9:27 AM

Jackie, it made perfect sense.  What a great idea.  So sad....just had a garage sale and got rid of a slew of empty wooden spools!

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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on 7 May 2009 12:01 PM

For me, well, I have this long, sharp knife that I use for, um, fileting steaks, yeah! Anyway, if I need to rip out some seams on a project because of, ya know, bad stitchin', I just use this finely honed instrument.

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Cate Prato wrote
on 7 May 2009 2:06 PM

You crack me up, Jamie. I need to improve my upper body strength, so maybe I should get one just for that.

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Barbm12 wrote
on 7 May 2009 3:12 PM

LOVE this and am going to go make my own right now, thanks!

Barbara

http://craftgate.com/blog/BarbaraMatthiessen

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farscapegal wrote
on 7 May 2009 3:17 PM

Approachable Art:

Sybil said:

"My bottle of aloe vera that I use to keep inks from spreading.  It is the one thing that most people who come into my sewing room will ask about.    I listen to my Farscape dvds while I sew.  I am a sci fi geek as well as a quilter.  My two obsessions:Farscape and quilting.

Sybil"

 

Your what to do what? This is totally new to me, can you explain how you use aloe vera to keep inks from spreading? I'm fascinated!

 

I mix my inks with the aloe vera and it keeps it from spreading on my fabric.   You need to use clear aloe vera not the scented or colored ones and not the plant. Just go to where you buy aloe vera for sunburns.  I put a few drops of ink into about a tblsp of aloe vera (actually I just put some in a plastic cup and don't really measure it).  Doing it this way keeps the ink where you want it and it doesn't spread like ink has a tendency to do.  The aloe vera dissolves and you never know it was there.

 

Sybil

Earth. Terra Firma.  Seems forever it's filled my thoughts, been my goal.  And now...I'm here. 

John Crichton,  Farscape

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