Sewing together small pieces of fabric.

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Ylva S wrote
on 16 Jun 2012 2:43 PM

Hi all...I am new to quilting, and I got myself a nice quite fancy sewing machine (Silver 9000E) with lots of stitches and feet and so on. I do not know if it is something I do wrong, or if the sewing machine is faulty or simply not set up properly, but when I try to sew together small pieces of fabric, the machine chews the fabric into the "footpad" sewing stitch after stitch on the others making a complete mess of the fabric...

Can it be that I have the tension too loose or tight, or is the needle too old? Is there something else I have not thought of...? Any help is greatly appreciated...:)

Many thanks,

Ylva in Inverness, UK

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Muppin wrote
on 18 Jun 2012 8:15 AM

Hi Ylva-

This may be the pressure of your presser foot is too tight.  Try loosening up the presser foot tension before you try the tension of the threads.

Cheryl / Muppin

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Ylva S wrote
on 18 Jun 2012 3:30 PM

Thank you, Cheryl.

I will sit down and give that a try one evening this week. I have not done much experimenting with the machine yet...I think it is time for that to change:)

 

Ylva

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Muppin wrote
on 19 Jun 2012 8:36 AM

I know that when you fiddle with tensions, it can be hard to get it back to the previous setting, but at least the presser foot pressure settings are easy to go back to.  Good luck!

Cheryl / Muppin

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BeverlyS31 wrote
on 28 Jun 2012 11:55 AM

Hi Ylva!

I have never replied to a question before, so I hope I am doing it correctly. :)   I would try sewing on a small double-folded scrap piece of fabric "sewing off" the edge onto  your "real" fabric.  That should help with it not getting caught in the needle plate.   Also, using a stitch plate with a single hole (it is a very small hole)  instead of one that will accommodate  a zip-zag stitch should help also.  I am not sure if you would have to purchase the single hole plate separately or not. The first option though, should hopefully take care of your problem.  Enjoy your new machine!

Beverly

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Jean G. wrote
on 29 Jun 2012 12:38 PM

I would suggest that you move the two threads (in the needle and from the bobbin) to the back of the machine and hold them taut when you start sewing.

This action usually solves that problem for me; give it a try.

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AWright wrote
on 3 Jul 2012 1:32 PM

You might want to try placing a piece of lightweight tear-away or water-soluble stabilizer underneath.  You could also place your fabric on a piece of newsprint and start and end on the paper.  Tear it away when you finish.  

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on 10 Jul 2012 11:30 AM

I agree.. I always use a scrap of double fabric to start my patchwork  and find it is the best solution to this problem

karen

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Ylva S wrote
on 11 Jul 2012 4:43 PM

Thank you everyone who replied. I have a few options in what to try when I start experimenting. I am really looking forward to figuring out the best way for me to do this:) I have so many ideas but lack the experience...but then without experimenting I won't get the experience...:)

I will try to let you know how it went:)

 

hugs, Ylva

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coffeebreak wrote
on 5 Aug 2012 11:26 AM

If it is what I think you are talking about.. I know what you mean. Solution... really easy and fun!

Thread starters!  I forget where I learned about it, but am so glad I did and don't know how I have been sewing for 45 years without it!  You take small scraps of fabric that you would normally throw away, and fold them in half so you have two layers for sturdiness. Then put that under your pressure foot with about 1/2 in sticking out in the front (that you will sew on) then, start sewing and just as you get to the end of the "thread starter" scoot your working piece right up there next to the thread starter and continue sewing. As the pressure foot leaves the thread starter, it will automatically grab and start sewing your work and on you go! Works great. I have a small box (cut the bottom off a Capri Sun carong....small but nice a strong cardboard) and I just toss in my scraps as they become available and grab them as i need them. You can use one little piece dozens and dozens of times.

I just last week taught my two grand daughters to quilt using charms. and showed them how to do this...and they picked up on it just fine and the youngest one just loved that part!  In showing her how to cut the thread starter off when done....I told her to hold the piece up by the fabric and let the thread started dangle and cut it off.. I was just holding my hand to catch it to show her how to finish it up...and she just took a liking to it and would pick it up and say "Hand, Nanny" and I'd have to putmy hand to catch the thread starter.

But it is a great way to stop that puckering and jamming at the start of any seam. I do it all the time now and like i said.. how'd I get so good without it? But then again... sewing for 40 years...habits tend to be forgotten!

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