Hot Textiles

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WedeWorks wrote
on 9 May 2009 1:32 PM

I've been waiting for summer (open air) to experiment with melting fibers and plastics for use in art quilts.  If any members have first hand experience to share, I'd like to get your input.  Thanks.  Judy

Keep going, success is often just around the corner. (The Power of Focus)

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Posts 469
on 9 May 2009 7:22 PM

Keep a spray bottle of water nearby, wear goggles and a respirator (I don't trust just a mask for most of my melt experiments) and have fun! :D Melting different mediums is one of my favorite things to do and sometimes I'll just devote an entire afternoon in the studio playing with my heat gun, pyrography tool, and Bic lighters. Some of my favorite melties are Organza, the little silver packages some candy bars come in, and Tyvek (try staining Tyvek first with Lumiere, dye ink pads, watercolors or alcohol inks... yummy).

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Posts 99
pandabolt wrote
on 9 May 2009 7:55 PM

I love zapping stuff.  It's always good for a second look when you purchase a bunch of quarter yards of chiffons, brocades, and anything else that might respond to heat:  when asked the proverberial question "what are you going to do with all these little pieces?"  Oh, I'm going to burn them>  He he.

I use Tyvek, Lutradure, Pellon,  Angelina fibers and films as well as the usual fabrics. 

Paint the Tyvek, Lutradure, and pellon first with any kinds of paints or inks or crayons or whatever trips you trigger.  Oh, and try some craft felt, too.  Layer any of the above on the felt; stitch to your heart's delight, then zap away.  Or cut some of the pieces into long skinny triangles; wrap around a metal knitting needle, secure with a pin, or maybe wrap with a great yarn, and then zap.  You will get great beads.  I like to do a little embossing on them as well.  And embossing works great on any of the sheets that you have created as well.

Oh, there is just so much that you can do.  It is such fun.

Here is a picture of a piece that I did recently:


The center is a banner fabric that I painted, sewed onto felt, then zapped.  The same fabric behind and to the left was sewn directly to the quilt, and then zapped. 

Virtually any material that you can melt with heat is fair game.

Have fun, and show us what you created.

Peggy Holt

Missoula, Montana

 

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Posts 469
on 9 May 2009 8:45 PM

PeggyH:

I love zapping stuff.  It's always good for a second look when you purchase a bunch of quarter yards of chiffons, brocades, and anything else that might respond to heat:  when asked the proverberial question "what are you going to do with all these little pieces?"  Oh, I'm going to burn them>  He he

I agree, that is a fun moment... the looks you get are priceless lol.

 

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Posts 96
TheNeedler wrote
on 10 May 2009 7:42 AM

Hi, Judy.  I love playing with my heat gun and pyro. tool.  If something is just laying around, it had better watch out or I will experiment with it to see how interestingly it melts.  Great for making beads, pendants, wall hangings or items to include in you art quilts.

I have a piece in the Gallery under A Love Poem where I used the pyro. tool to cut and seal and to cut a leaf out of organza then distress it.  You can read the technique with the photo. 

Yesterday I took three empty Pop Tart pkgs. and went to town.  Wipe them off with paper towel really well so there is not a crumb or oil.  Stamp with alcohol ink in any pattern you like then use the heat gun until you have the type of surface you like.  You can melt holes completely through without a burnt look.  These pieces can be sewn into our quilts or applied with Gel medium.  You can cut pieces to shape then fill the hollows with gel medium and let dry.  This will keep the bubbled surface from collapsing if you put it in a fabric book or such that will be handled.        

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Posts 95
Carole31 wrote
on 10 May 2009 4:07 PM

Peggy, this is fantastic!!

I love it.

I have never zapped 'fabric'.... other than organza.

I am going to try this as soon as I can get outside.

There is a little piece on my blog... a recent one called April Showers that I used zapped Tyvek in. I had painted it first then

heat distressed it. It works great in my little piece.

I am at http:www.wyndhavenartandquilts.blogspot. com

 

Thank you for posting this and the invitation to show our work.

Carole

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