Fusible web transferred photos

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 13 May 2009 7:46 PM

This is a piece of rusted fabric with some photos that were transferred onto it using fusible webbing. The photos were then touched up with pastels and pencil crayons and covered with acrylic Gel medium. Now that I have gotten to this point I do not know what to do with it. I have had this hanging on my design board for a few weeks and cannot get the creative juices flowing. Any suggestions would be appreciated....even if they include cutting it up or just pitching it (lol).

Thanks.

Jody

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on 13 May 2009 8:14 PM

O o o o o, explain please this photo transfer using fusable? :D

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 14 May 2009 7:12 AM

This technique came from a Bonnie McCaffrey vidcast that I downloaded onto my ipod from the itunes site. You can also go to her website below and watch the vidcast called "Maggie Grey". This lady has written I think 10 books on a number of different textile techniques. Actually all her vidcasts are great and worth watching.

Basically, you can take a photocopy or a piece from your printer. I tried both a copy from my injet printer at home and my laser printer at work...both seemed to work. Cut a piece of fusible web about the size of your photo and iron it onto your fabric. Then iron your photo, face down, onto the fusible really well. After that take a sponge and dampen the back of the photo. When it is damp enough you should be able to start to rub off the paper with your finger. Let this dry and then go over the photo again lightly to remove more of the paper. If you rub too hard your fusible could start to come off. This happened to me but I figured it just added to the aged look. When I was done the second time I found the photos were still quite washed out looking so I went in with some oil pastels and watercolour pencil crayons and touched up the photoos where I wanted too. I put clear acrylic medium over the photos just to see what would happen but I don't think you would need to do that if you don't want to.

http://www.bonniemccaffery.com/vidcasts/033.html

I was looking at your pear last night and liked your dark outline that framed the entire postcard. Do you think a similar look around each of these individual photos would work? May be with a variegated dark brown thread? Let me know what you think.

Jody

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MTRuth wrote
on 14 May 2009 2:55 PM

Jody - I can't really tell if the transferred photos have a theme or not. What are you trying to say with this piece? Or is it just a practice piece to try out the new technique? If it is has a theme, perhaps you can think more about what you're trying to say with the piece and then more ideas will come. Or if it is just a technique oriented piece, perhaps there is something else you'd like to try on it.

I personally have a problem with long, skinny horizontal pieces. I find that they look better in a vertical format. You could cut this piece into four squares and then play around with the orientation. I think it would be better in a vertical format with the individual "squares" offset a bit. Or you could put them together in a more rectangular format. I think a darker border would be good to offset the darkness of the photos. I also think small highlights with a different color such as turquoise might add a bit more contrast and zip. Or perhaps you could add some embellisments of small rusty metal bits? Just some ideas to hopefully get you started again.

 

Ruth

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on 14 May 2009 5:53 PM

Jody Johnson:

This technique came from a Bonnie McCaffrey vidcast that I downloaded onto my ipod from the itunes site. You can also go to her website below and watch the vidcast called "Maggie Grey".

Oh, Jody, this is fabulous, I can't wait to try it, thank you!

Jody Johnson:

I was looking at your pear last night and liked your dark outline that framed the entire postcard. Do you think a similar look around each of these individual photos would work? May be with a variegated dark brown thread? Let me know what you think.

Which photos? Are they posted to your profile?

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 15 May 2009 11:09 PM

Hi Ruth,

The photos are all from the badlands in the Drumheller area of Alberta. The first one is at an abandoned coal mine and the other three are land formations in around the hoodos which are a Unesco world hertiage site. In University I obtained a Bachelor of Science in Geography with a focus on landforms, soils and hydrology. This was one are of Alberta I spent a lot of time in doing field work and now my oldest daughter has taken a huge interest in dinosaurs and this region, like the Badlands of Montana, has some of the most notable dinosaur deposits in the world.

I don't know what I am trying to say with this piece. It was partly experimental and as well, I guess I am just trying to bring to the forefront what Alberta is all about and have started here. Over the past 6 or 7 years we were really booming and had a lot of new residents moving into the province. Commonly I hear would people complaining about how little there is to do in this province, how flat and boring so much of it is and on and on. I finally started asking people if they had been to this place or that around the province and generally got a resounding "no, I didn't even know about it". 

I mucked about with both the horizontal and the vertical arangemet before I fused these and was torn. I ended up going horizontal but maybe vertical really would have been better. I think I might cut this up and playing with a few of the ideas you mention above. I like the rusty metal bits idea too.

Thanks for your honesty Ruth.

Jody

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MTRuth wrote
on 16 May 2009 1:23 PM

You're welcome! You're not to far from me if you're in Alberta. I look forward to seeing your progression on this piece.

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on 16 May 2009 4:22 PM

I definitely would not throw this out. They look great. They have that aged look to them. You can keep it in one piece and separately frame them somehow with sewing or some other material or cut them up and use them separately. Have you thought about cutting it up and putting them back together somehow in an art quilt?  You could also use them in a series.  They could go together in some sort of mosaic.  I see walnut ink staining somewhere in there.  I see some more sewing and tearing. Maybe even some burlap.  How about a fabric book that tells an imaginary story?  Some sort of box to make it 3D?  If you want a spot of color, just use a bit of contrasting color to highlight a certain area.  You could always insert Waldo (just kidding).  You could always put another image over it and kinda do a photoshop kinda thing.  You could even do it with a sheet of mica or transparency.  It is a great background.  I hope that I was able to give you some ideas.

Belinda aka crazyartgirl

Blog:  http://alteredbelly.blogspot.com/

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Carole31 wrote
on 16 May 2009 6:14 PM

Jody, this is too cool to throw out or discard.

No, check out some websites and blogs for ideas.... have you checked Lyric Kinards site? or Beth Wheeler? or even google rust dying which will take you to some websites to see what people have done. You have had some good suggestions, esp. from the last post.

You go girl... you will be surprised!

Carole

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Gumnut wrote
on 16 May 2009 7:39 PM

Jody, I think it shows a lot of imagination and really like the idea.

You could frame it in four sections, build a quilt around it....endless possibilities.  I look forward to experimenting with this technique and also seeing more of your work.

Well done.

Cheers, Jacqui

New Zealand

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 16 May 2009 8:14 PM

 I see walnut ink staining somewhere in there. 

Thank you everybody, you gave me lots of things to think about. It might be awhile before I digest all your ideas and come up with something.

Belinda, I am just wondering what this walnut ink stainingtechnique  is as I have never heard of it before. It sounds like something that would add to that aged look.

Thanks again.

Jody

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on 17 May 2009 7:03 AM

You can just take some walnut ink and dilute it to the color you want.  Take a brush or even your fingers and dribble it onto the cloth or substrate. You can even dip cloth into it.  It gives it a great stained look. Kinda like a coffee stain without the smell.  You can take a coffee cup even and do the ring around the coffee cup thing. You can smatter and spatter by smacking two brushes together. Do it lightly so you don't ruin your picts.  Walnut ink is great for coloring edges of fabric.  Also, Distress ink pad is good for that. Direct to pad and then wet the cloth to have the ink seep in a bit.

Belinda aka crazyartgirl

Blog:  http://alteredbelly.blogspot.com/

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 18 May 2009 9:21 AM

Thanks Belinda. I will have to give this a try.

Jody

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TheNeedler wrote
on 18 May 2009 9:27 AM

Jody, in my photo of A Love Poem I used walnut ink sprayed onto pale burlap to get a darker tone for the background.  It is the layer just above the green background.  Marvelous stuff and works well with resits made from anything......Jim D

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Jody Johnson wrote
on 19 May 2009 8:23 AM

Thanks Jim.

This is a very lovely piece. I think I am going to have to try some of this either on this project or another.

Belinda or Jim, is this product hard to find? Can you get it at Michaels or do I likely need to go to one of my local art stores. I am in Canada but we can pretty much get whatever is available in the US.

Thanks again.

 

Jody

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