Fabric paint comparison

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mtnjohn wrote
on 17 Apr 2010 12:14 PM

In my reading about fabric painting there appears to be 2 brands most often mentioned - Jacquard and Setacolor.  From what I gather both are thinned with water; and, applicators (brushes, etc) can be cleaned with water.  Setacolor is mentioned in relation to sun painting (heliographic?) whereas Jacquard is not.

Can they both be used the same for all aspects of fabric painting?

Is there any major difference between the 2 products?

Does one of them result in paler colors than the other?

Does either of them require extra processing other than drying and heat setting?

If anyone has used these, or other, fabric painting products I would appreciate your sharing you experiences and views on why you would use different ones for different applications / methods.  Also, if there is one which is good for multiple purposes that would be good to know as well.

Thank you,

John

 

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on 17 Apr 2010 12:57 PM

Hi John,

I haven't used Jacquard paints enough to comment on them, but I am very familiar  with Setacolor.  The paints come either transparent or opaque.  The opaque paints produce quite vibrant, very opaque color .  The transparent paints are actually equally vibrant, but transparent making blending colors on the fabric easy and these are the colors used for sun painting.  They are as easy to use as dipping your brush in the pot.  I heat set mine by folding them and placing them on aluminum foil in a 300 degree oven for 5 minutes.  This makes them reliably washable. 

 

Kathleen

 

Kathleen

 

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reginabdunn wrote
on 29 May 2010 6:46 PM

Sorry for the late reply but I haven't had much time lately to monitor the forums. I've used Jacquard paints because they are found in the stores in my area. I think they do a very good job and the Jacquard Textile Paint works for sun printing, too. I worked with the Setacolor paint in a workshop and it worked well. But the only way to compare them would be for someone to do a scientific experiment with both paints, side-by side under various conditions. Is there anyone out there that wants to do that for all of us? My guess is that there wouldn't be much difference between the two. Jacquard has 4 types of paints that I've tried. The Textile Paint (which is somewhat transparent), the Neopaque (which is the most opaque one), Lumiere (which is metallic), and Dyn a Flo (which acts almost like a dye).

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on 30 May 2010 4:20 AM

I use Jacquard paints in my art quilts all the time.  I use them when I silk screen as well. I also use Lumiere metallics.  They both heat set well with an iron. I can tell you from experience that they wash well because my t-shirts are spotted with Lumiere and Jacquard paints and they do not come off for the life of me.  I have tried to get them off before they were even heat set to no avail because I accidentally was messy and got it on my jeans or t-shirt.  I have Setacolr as well but have not used them yet.  Lumiere metallics are very opaque.  Jacquard paints are transparent to opaque depending on the color and what it says on the bottle.

Belinda aka crazyartgirl

Blog:  http://alteredbelly.blogspot.com/

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ckquilter wrote
on 1 Jun 2010 7:22 PM

hi john

 

a bit of additonal info about the paints -

both are acrylic. all the acrylic fabricpaints should be mixable and still give good results. you should not need to buy all colors of both brands - unless you really like spending money.

i have only used a couple jacquard. i like the pebeo transparent because i do a lot of sun printing - and don't want a ton of paint i won't use laying around.  

i also like paint which does notchange the hand of thefabric much - and the jacquard paint makes the fabric stiffer than the pebeo does.

i like the paints to blend - and i use them to overpaint preprinted fabric, as well as white, and that is another reason i like the transparent - it allows the base color of the fabricto blend with the paint color and show thru. if you want to totally cover the base, then use the opaque.

i use the lumiere to mix with pebeo transparent to give metalc effects - and have had it sun print fine, with up to 25% lumiere added. but the lumiere does make the fabric stiffer.

i used to iron all my painted fabric - and then realized it really is not needed. but is a lot of work. i let the fabric sit for a day or 2 after painting, to let the paint really cure, and then just throw everything into a regular washer/dryer cycle, with soap even; and everything has always come out fine.

i have used the transparent setacolor on white cotton, commercially printed cotton, batik cotton - and all work fine  (i do prewash everything with detergent or synthapol. and dry withOUT dryer sheet or fabric softener)

i also paint a lot of sheers (all different fabric content - poly, rayon,linen, silk........) and also textured fabrics (velvets, embroidered, cheesecloth) using the transparent paint, and they have all painted fine. i wash them afterwards too, and they come out fine.

i used to be able to get the setacolor locally - but last year the dealer quit carrying it. so i will have to mail order it from now on. and i have heard that dy na flow can be used for sun printing (it is also transparent). so i am gonna try it - and if it works, i will be buying only 1 kind of paint in the future (and enough lumiere to mix with it when i want metallic).

i have used dy na flow in the past and like it very much for painting - it changes the hand of the fabric the least of all the paints i have tried. i have also used it to paint yarn and even cotton thread - i made a randomly variegated thread - with dy na flow - and it runs through the sewing machine  fine - which would not happen with most/all? of the other paints.  they would make a stiff, gloppy thread.

also - you do not need to buy all colors of the paint - unless you want to. if you have the 3 primaries, and black, you can mix all your own colors from there. i do also buy the sienna - easier than mixing it. and if i am gonna do a lot of 1 color (i like their moss green) then i would buy it.

usually the white is opaque - so i don't get it. and add black slowly!!!    i start with the lighter colors, and then add black a drop at a time, mix thoroughly, test the color, before adding more.

the colors can be diluted extensively with water - and will end up very light. but a 1 part paint to 1 to 2 parts water will give very vibrant color on white fabric. (and is the recommended dilution for sun printing)      even 4 to 5 parts water will be vibrant.

the book i have on sun printing says to use the paint within 3 weeks of its being diluted - but that is not necessary. (this is transparent setacolor) the first year i sun printed, i ran out of paint days, and had several containers of diluted paint left. i hated to just throw it out - so i let it sit in the laundry room til the next summer (from early september to late june) and then tried it the next year - and it sun printed just fine.

when i am painting. i don't paint shapes/figures with these - i am making washes of color, for either sun printing, or landscapes.

if you want to paint people or flowers - you will need to do it differently - as these paints will diffuse across the fabric.

to summarize - i prefer to have just 1 kind of paint - but need several to do the different things i want to accomplish. i like the dy na flow best - because it changes the hand of the fabric minimally - and i can paint yarn and thread with it also.   and if it will sun print - it will be what i buy in the future.

i willstill buy lumiere (a gold, and the pearl white) to mix to add metallic effects. (i also add pearl ex for other metalic colors).

if the dy na flow won't sun print - i will continue to buy the transparent setacolor - as it aso changes the hand minimally, and has worked well on cotton and all the other sheers and textured fabrics i have painted with it.

hope that helps, and is not too overwhelming.    ckquilter 

 

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sha1non wrote
on 8 Jun 2010 4:24 PM

I had read this post a while ago and put in the interesting but not for me category.  This afternoon out of pure frustration--you know after pulling every blue I owned out of my stash and not finding the "right blue" I painted fabric.  A stark blue  and white batik became something  much softer and interesting.  And it was exciting  and interesting to do.  It works in my project.  Thank you for the information and help.

My sewing machine is shuddering--What is my owner going to do next!

Shannon

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Peggy Szasz wrote
on 9 Jun 2010 4:25 AM

Hi Shannon,  You did exactly what I did....I was frustrated that I couldn't find the right blue fabric for my sky so off to the library to get some books on painting and a stop at Michaels to get some paint.  Since then I have invested in Setacolor paints and love their effects on the fabric.  Have fun!  Peggy

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mtnjohn wrote
on 12 Jun 2010 1:39 PM

Thank you!

This information will definitely help me narrow down what brand to experiment with so as to not spend a lot of $$ on different brands for different applications.

John

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caren12 wrote
on 29 Jun 2010 1:56 PM

I have both setacolor and dyenaflow.  I love them both.  Setacolor can be annoying because it is real thick and to sun print it has to be thinned with water.  I always make a mess with the dynaflow beacause it is so thin I end up turning my hands colors.  (yea I know I should wear gloves!)  But they both have beautiful colors that stay put.

Caren12

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soot2 wrote
on 2 Sep 2010 6:53 PM

Does anyone know of a transparent white fabric paint? Something I could thin so it would be very light and very transparent.\

Kathy

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Muppin wrote
on 3 Sep 2010 9:00 AM

Kathy-

The only way i get that effect is to thin the paint with water.

Cheryl / Muppin

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ckquilter wrote
on 6 Sep 2010 1:03 AM

hi kathy

what effect are you trying to accomplish?     because a white transparent paint does not make sense to me??

if you just want a paint color lighter - you would dilute with water or medium. and are you starting with white fabric??          ckquilter

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on 6 Sep 2010 6:57 AM

mtnjohn:

In my reading about fabric painting there appears to be 2 brands most often mentioned - Jacquard and Setacolor.  From what I gather both are thinned with water; and, applicators (brushes, etc) can be cleaned with water.  Setacolor is mentioned in relation to sun painting (heliographic?) whereas Jacquard is not.

Can they both be used the same for all aspects of fabric painting?

Yes, but they have very different properties. "Sun printing" is really a reaction between the ground you've chosen (paper, fabric, etc) and the paint itself. Exposing paint to sunlight or heat (for instance, if it's dried under a lamp) forces the binder in the paint to dry more rapidly than its designed to do. The effect of this is that the pigment is drawn more and more tightly into the still-wet fibers, leaving just the binder to the dryer fibers. Essentially, you can cause the pigment to flow where you want it to.

You can do this with some of Jacquard's products, but others would have to be thinned fairly heavily to achieve it, but when you do that you break down the binder altogether, making it harder to set the paints: they could wash out later. Other Jacquard products are already liquid but still retain a high pigment load, making them better candidates and more like Setacolor paints.

mtnjohn:
Is there any major difference between the 2 products?

Yes! Setacolor, which has a high pigment load, can still deliver undiluted pigment to your fibers while mostly maintaining the hand of the fabric. Heaviler-bodied paints, such as some that Jacquard makes, will change the hand of the fabric anywhere from slightly to substantially, depending on the product and your application of it.

mtnjohn:
Does one of them result in paler colors than the other?

The paints themselves will provide a constant depth of color. You are in control of the value of the color and can change it by adding water, flow medium, or white paint.

mtnjohn:
Does either of them require extra processing other than drying and heat setting?

No.

Hope this helps!

- Judi

My Blog   My Art

 

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ckquilter wrote
on 6 Sep 2010 5:19 PM

new info for dy na flo - it sunprints just fine. i used it this summer and it printed fine - but it did need to be thinned with water to do so. the unthinned dy na flo did not really sun print - or was very faint. but all the colors i tried (at least 7 or 8) printed fine when diluted with water. and they went through the washer/dryer cycle fine also.    (i don't even bother heat setting anymore - just leave the painted fabric alone for a week - and then throw it in the wash. they come out fine(i am on well water though - so i don't know if there would be a difference with chemically treated water containing chlorine.))

 

also, i have sun printed on sheer fabrics - and they turn out gorgeous. i have a friend who gives me lots of samples. and have tried painting and sun printing a bunch of them. they are all different fiber contents. i had the paint wash out of 1 - but the other 20 or 30 different samples all went through the wash cycle fine. again, without heat setting - just let them sit for a week after painting(and i' not sure they even need that)      ckquilter

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soot2 wrote
on 7 Sep 2010 7:33 AM

I have a piece of fabric about 44" x 36" that is just a forest of brown trees with sort of a light or medium Cambridge blue background and loads of bare branches with white snow on them. I will embroider over the snow a lot.

But I wanted to just cover parts of it with a pale wash so that it would look foggier.  I don't see how I can fasten tulle in odd shapes on it to achieve that, and perhaps painting with a light wash would be better.

Kathy

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