Can you use fusible on tulle??

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Twister2 wrote
on 25 Jun 2011 3:22 PM

I am wanting to use tulle for shadows on an art quilt. Can I use iron-on fusible on tulle? I tried fabric glue but it is discoloring my base fabric,a pink satin. Or is the tulle too porous "open" for fusible? How about basting spray? What do others use for shadow effects? Thanks

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Dale Kathryn wrote
on 25 Jun 2011 3:40 PM

I don't know about tulle, but I have used Misty-Fuse on lace in areas where the lace was disintegrating.  It worked very well. Remember to use baking parchment or something when you iron it!

TADA / BC

"To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage." - Georgia O'Keeffe

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ckquilter wrote
on 25 Jun 2011 7:08 PM

hi twister

yes you can use fusible with tulle. but the tulle is porous - and the fusible will come through it. so use a teflon press cloth to protect your iron. and you might need to scrub extra fusible off the press cloth each time. and i will press the tulle, remove extra fusible from the press cloth, and repeat until i don't get any more fusible coming off.

use the lightest weight fusible you can. the fusible can also be colored before using, if needed. you can use dye or ink or paint to color the fusible.

 the fusible also does not have to cover the entire piece of tulle. if i am working with little slivers and small pieces, i will use fusible over the entire piece of tulle/sheer.  if i am working with pieces large enough to handle easily, i may just use small pieces of fusible to tack the tulle/sheer into place until stitched.

i will start with a small layer in the darkest area. add a slightly bigger layer - the area where there is now 2 thicknesses will be darker. and then keep adding bigger pieces, until you have the shading you want. if you make the last piece the largest - you will have caught all the edges under it, and have just one raw edge to worry about.               you can work the other way - a big piece to start with, and then more, smaller pieces in the darkest part of the shadow - but you will have more raw edges to catch down. but being as tulle does not ravel, it is not a big problem.

you can also use sheers for shadows. a white sheer can be colored to any color you want - with dye or ink or paint, before being applied. they will usually ravel more than tulle. but the feel will be smoother. and they work fine with fusible.

you don't absolutely have to use fusible. you can just lay an oversized piece of the  tulle or sheer over your base fabric, and stitch along the edge you want, and then cut away the extra. and that process can also be repeated, to make parts of the shadow darker.

ckquilter

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Twister2 wrote
on 26 Jun 2011 10:11 AM

Thank you both for the quick replies. I am anxious to try the solutions mentioned. I didn't even think about painting or dying the shadows; did experiment with colored pencils and it left the satin dull. I will have to check my supplies. I just bought some light fusible but haven't used it yet. I am working on my sample first. My piece has tea cups and maybe the satin is not the best fabric for this. Thanks again for the tips.

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Elaine255 wrote
on 29 Jun 2011 10:36 AM

have you heard of Bonash (bonding agent)?  It is sprinkled on and heat set, and would probably work well with tulle.  (You need to use a pressing cloth with it, as you would if you were using misty fuse.)  I've just started experimenting with the product and although I don't like it for all applications something like tulle would probably work.  I have used misty fuse for this type of application when I wanted a sheer tulle over water to make the water reflection look darker than the subject it was reflecting.

 

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ckquilter wrote
on 29 Jun 2011 7:35 PM

hi twister

in response to elaines recommendation of using bonash - i don't like it on sheers very much. you would need to use it very sparingly and melt it thoroughly, or it will leave a grainy effect. make sure you have a teflon press cloth on both top and bottom.       my biggest problem with using it with sheers or tulle, is by the time the bonash has melted enough to not be gritty anymore - the tulle has also melted. 

i have had much better luck with regular fusible when working with sheers. 

bonash works better for me when using sturdy, heat stable fabrics.                         ckquilter

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Twister2 wrote
on 29 Jun 2011 7:58 PM

The fusible worked well on the tulle, better on the black netting I found stashed away. The fusible on the tulle was best after it had dried for an hour or so. Love the teflon press cloth, just wiped off excess fusible with a paper towel. I found my fabric-paint squares I bought a couple of years ago and hadn't used since; they worked on the satin better than colored pencils for shading.  I am just getting more into the artsy side of quilting, so thank you all for the help. This has given me the confidence to continue my project.

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