Glossary

  • A
  • This tissue is composed of long, abaca fibers, and is semi-transparent, resembling Japanese papers in its appearance and construction. It can be treated like a lightweight fabric and used for a variety of different purposes and projects.
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  • Fine, glossy synthetic fibers that melt and fuse when heat is applied. Angelina comes in a wide variety of iridescent colors and can be stitched, fused with other fibers, or impressed with a rubber stamp and a warm iron.
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  • Sewing one or more smaller pieces of fabric onto a larger background, by hand or by machine.
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  • What is an ATC? Get this ATC project by Janet Ghio for free in the art quilt eBook . Artist Trading Cards, (commonly referred to as ATCs), are original miniature works of art, similar in size to baseball cards, that are traded with other artists. An ATC
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  • B
  • This cloth is created using wax-resist dyeing; parts of the fabric are coated with wax before dyeing so that the color does not penetrate, creating a pattern through the contrast between dyed and undyed areas.
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  • C
  • A Crazy Quilt has blocks assembled from irregular and sometimes scrap pieces; there is no set pattern or design. This pattern was popular during the Victorian period when they were made with silks and velvets and heavily embellished with embroidery.
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  • E
  • This refers to the process of adding heated pigmented wax (usually beeswax) to a surface. The wax/paint can be shaped before it sets using special metal tools. Though traditionally a form of painting, encaustic can also be used as a collage-like technique
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  • Vintage or antiquarian paper items other than books, such as postcards, photographs, greeting cards, decorative cutouts, paper dolls, signs, and so on.
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  • F
  • A fat quarter is a ¼ yard of fabric which measures roughly 18" x 22" instead of the 9" x 44" cut that you would get off of a bolt. This size allows you to cut out larger pieces. Fabric is frequently sold in individual fat quarters
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  • Sewing pieces to a foundation of muslin or plain fabric to assemble a quilt block is known as foundation piecing .
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  • A type of machine stitching that allows you to move around the fabric sandwich in any direction, creating geometric, flowing, or random patterns. Sewing machines must be specially equipped for this function, or must have the capacity to lower the feed
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  • A wrapping technique involving a square of cloth, simple knots, and twists.
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  • Very thin sheets of webbed, dried glue that can fuse fabrics and other fibers together when activated by heat. Comes in cut sheets or on a roll, housed between two layers of release paper.
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  • To target and cut a specific printed motif from fabric, rather than randomly cutting yardage.
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  • G
  • An acrylic polymer medium that can accept color media and other additives, such as glitter or fine beads, to create texture when applied to a surface.
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  • A thick white or black chalky mixture that can be painted onto paper or fabric to provide a rough-textured surface.
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  • H
  • Using heat (from an iron, heat gun, or clothes dryer) to make dyes, transfers, paints, or inks that have been applied to fabric permanent.
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  • J
  • Small quilts, 8-1/2 x 11 inches, that are accompanied by a journal with notes on the work and thoughts of the artist. This idea was c onceived by Karey Bresenhan of Quilts, Inc. The Journal Quilt Project made its debut at the International Quilt Market
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  • L
  • Long arm quilting is done using a very long bed (commercial) quilting machine.
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  • This is a polyester fabric-like material that has a wide variety of applications. It can be drawn or painted on to create a colored surface that still filters light. It is quite sturdy and can be cut into without fraying, and heat set up to 400 degrees
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  • M
  • Machine embroidery is a type of free motion machine stitching that uses either the basic running stitch or built-in stitch types to decorate a fabric surface with thread.
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  • A water-based, acrylic polymer emulsion that dries to an opaque, semi-gloss finish. Once hard, acrylic paint and other media can be applied.
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  • Monoprints are traditionally works on paper, but the monoprinting technique is now used by many quilt artists to print their fabric. It involves painting or inking onto a non-porous surface and pressing this surface onto a cloth to create a unique image
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  • N
  • Needle felting fuses an additional layer of fiber onto a base fiber or felted fabric. This can be done by hand with a needle felting brush or piece of foam and felting needle(s), or using a needle felting machine. In both cases, the fabrics/fibers are
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  • O
  • Quilting stitches that follow the edge of each fabric piece, and are either next to the seam or in it (known as quilting “in-the-ditch”).
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  • Literally, to dye or paint fabric over another dye or printed pattern. Many artists like to alter commercial and vintage textiles by overdyeing, thus creating unique "new" fabrics.
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  • P
  • A transparent, non-yellowing gel medium. You can mix this with acrylic paints to produce a thick, self-colored textured surface on fabric.
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  • Patchwork, sometimes referred to as pieced work, refers to a method of sewing together smaller pieces of fabric (or other materials) to create a larger design. Traditionally, patchwork involves geometric shapes that are precisely cut to the same size
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  • Featured image is from "A Party to Dye For!" by Kristine Lundblad, Quilting Arts Aug/Sept 2012. PDF fabric is fabric that has been "prepared for dyeing," meaning it is cotton and free of whiteners or sizing. This makes the fabric better
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  • A white, water-soluble glue good for most mixed-media projects. It dries transparent.
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  • R
  • You can find directions for this small reverse appliqué sampler (by Beryl Taylor) that can be left as is, further embellished, or perhaps even inspire a series of work. From Quilting Arts Magazine Dec 2010/Jan 2011 Most everyone is familiar with
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  • S
  • Sashing is s trips of fabric that are sewn between pieced blocks to separate them while joining blocks together to create a quilt top. Sashing is sometimes continued around the outside of the quilt top to create a border.
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  • This is one of the quickest and easiest ways to finish a quilt, though it is slightly less sturdy than other methods. To self-bind, trim the excess backing fabric so that it is even along each edge of the quilt, then fold it over and onto the front of
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  • You can find directions to create shibori fabrics, like this one by Jeannie Palmer Moore, in Quilting Arts Magazine Dec 2011/Jan 2012 This is the Japanese term for many resist-dye textile techniques, commonly translated as shaped resist dyeing (which
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  • A beautiful example of shisha mirrors on fabric, from the tutorial in Quilting Arts Magazine Spring 2002 . Shisha Simplified Shisha mirrors are small, round mirrors used to decorate fabric, often a feature of Asian/Indian clothing. Shisha embroidery –
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  • Sticks of oil paint in solid form that look like a large crayon. The outer coating must be peeled off before each use because the sticks self-seal after 24 hours.
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  • Cocoons, the purest form of silk, can be stretched and spun into yarn or left whole for collage and other fiber art projects. They can be bought pre-dyed or ready for dyeing and/or hand painting.
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  • These are byproducts of reeling silk from the cocoon; silk accumulates on these rods and remnants of it remain. The resulting rods can be dyed or separated into layers, and used in paper making, stitching and silk fusion.
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  • A faux painting technique that gives new surfaces an elegant, aged look made by repeatedly tapping on a surface with paint or ink and a stiff brush. While most methods of faux painting hide imperfections, stippling actually highlights them.
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  • Stitches that are sewn parallel to the seams of components in a quilt. The stitching is done very close to the seam and preferably on the side of seam that does not have seam allowance pressed underneath.
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  • This patchwork technique involves a series of fabric strips that are sewn together along the long edges to form blocks of fabric. The resulting blocks can be used as is or cut and re-stitched to create many different effects. This technique is the basis
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  • A detergent made for rinsing excess dyes out of fabrics without damaging the set colors.
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  • T
  • Special sheets used to protect iron and ironing board from fusible web residue.
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  • This beautiful work by Anne Eckley was featured in the "Thread Painting" article from Quilting Arts Magazine Winter 2003 Simply put thread painting is using a sewing machine like a paintbrush; free-motion stitching images and designs. It's
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  • You can find directions for creating transfers like these in "Tapping into Image Transfers" from Quilting Arts Magazine Apr/May 2009 A transfer occurs when you take a photo printed on one surface and move it to another. Transfer Artist Paper™
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  • A "paper" that is made from high-density polyethylene fibers and has the characteristics of paper, film, and fabric. It can be stitched and when heated it shrinks and distorts.
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  • U
  • Ultra-thick embossing enamel. Similar to regular embossing enamel, but, as the name suggests, is thicker and can be impressed after heating.
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  • V
  • A natural polymer made from wood pulp. In the 1920s the word rayon was adopted, replacing viscose. Viscose was first used for coating fabrics, which it did quite successfully. Further development led to viscose being spun into thread for embroidery and
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  • W
  • Fabric that "disappears" in cold or hot water (depending on the brand and its use) after it has been stitched on, leaving only the stitching.
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  • Learn how to create pieces like these in this free water-soluble stabilizers tutorial . What is it? Water-soluble stabilizer is a fine polyvinyl fabric feels like very thin plastic. It needs to be doubled in an embroidery hoop to be stitched on, but is
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  • X
  • A thick, creamy medium that can be applied with a brush, roller, or sponge. It expands when heated, can be painted, and it is non-toxic.
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