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Episode 1308-2 Julia Wood: Unconventional hexagons

17 Dec 2013
Views: 29,507
Downloads: 7,899
Comments: 24
File Size: 147.6kB
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Comments

donnaneeld wrote
on 14 Mar 2014 6:04 PM

The Haxagon  Quilt is beautiful ,fun to make them.

 

donnaneeld wrote
on 14 Mar 2014 6:04 PM

The Haxagon  Quilt is beautiful ,fun to make them.

 

ValerieH@18 wrote
on 17 Mar 2014 10:48 PM

This is the easiest method for making hexagons that I've ever seen.  I am inspired to give this method a try.  Sure beats english paper piecing.  Thank you for sharing.

ValerieH@18 wrote
on 17 Mar 2014 10:48 PM

This is the easiest method for making hexagons that I've ever seen.  I am inspired to give this method a try.  Sure beats english paper piecing.  Thank you for sharing.

Joyce@52 wrote
on 22 Mar 2014 8:45 AM

Love this technique - will give it a try.

leslyharris wrote
on 25 Mar 2014 2:35 PM

Where can we find the video to watch you make this hexagon.  I struggle with the last part of the hexagon.  Thanks

LinKat wrote
on 12 Apr 2014 1:41 PM

Great idea for making hexagon easily!  I've been making quilts in circles for years... never new I could make the circles into hexagons.  I never stop learning new techniques!  Thank you.

LinKat wrote
on 12 Apr 2014 1:41 PM

Great idea for making hexagon easily!  I've been making quilts in circles for years... never new I could make the circles into hexagons.  I never stop learning new techniques!  Thank you.

 

oldgrumpy52 wrote
on 28 Apr 2014 10:43 PM

Do you have instructions on how to turn into quilt. I mean how to do the outside edges 

 

 

magierats wrote
on 17 May 2014 11:10 AM

Would love to see the video of this process, where can I find it.  Thank you in advance.

Marie

Jan Bear wrote
on 14 Jun 2014 2:14 PM

The written instructions are totally unclear to me.  Pictures (better than a thousand words) would be extremely helpful. 

Just a dumb dough-dough

Djhendricks wrote
on 14 Jun 2014 2:37 PM

This is such a great method!  Thank you

KaronTX wrote
on 17 Jun 2014 10:27 PM

I turned 100 circles into hexies in just 3 evenings. This goes so quickly and doesn't take a lot of fabric.  I want to make a quilt out of the large circles but haven't figured out the math to know how much fabric I'll need. Love this method.

Donna Dieter wrote
on 25 Jun 2014 1:20 PM

This is such an easy method and is really quick- can do a lot of hexies in a very short time- thanks so much!!

sewred31 wrote
on 26 Jun 2014 6:00 PM

This is such a great idea!  Does anyone remember the dimensions of the hexagons for the bedspread?  I think the small one was a 3 - 3 1/2 inch circle, but I'm not sure.

nancy alsop wrote
on 3 Jul 2014 7:28 PM

 I would like to make this type of quilt. I saw technique on t.v. This there a pattern available?

spadilla wrote
on 6 Jul 2014 4:11 PM

Where can we

find the video to watch you make this hexagon.  I struggle with the last part of the hexagon.  Thanks

eiram934 wrote
on 21 Jul 2014 4:27 PM

How can episode 1306 on hexagonal quilts be downloaded to tablet?

dahn98 wrote
on 24 Jul 2014 12:38 PM
Mwolfer896 wrote
on 3 Aug 2014 11:34 PM
Mwolfer896 wrote
on 3 Aug 2014 11:34 PM
Annmarie58 wrote
on 15 Aug 2014 12:27 PM
Kerrie Reed wrote
on 2 Dec 2014 7:34 AM

I made this quilt in King size, I was able to get about 6 large hexagons from a yard of 45" fabric, I made the small hexes from scraps, so for a King size it took, 40 yards of 45" fabric. I used both hand dyed, and commercial prints for my quilt, so on the hand dyes I bought 90" fabric and was able to get about 12 from each yard. The large circles were 14" and they made an approximate 7" finished hexagon. I used 240 large and small hexagons for the entire quilt and about 1 yard of 2.5" strips for the binding. I cut my edges straight and used the cut off bits from each side to fill in the holes on the other. I found it very easy to hand stitch the small circles while watching tv and then pressing them in large batches, but the large hexagons needed to be pressed as I went, after each layer folded up I pressed it down and that was easier for me. I did the math to size it up and down to the differnt bad sizes, it was not much difference in fabric usag and number of hexagons between the sizes. For the left to right it sized about 7 inches per piece, and up and down it had to be measured at about 3.5 inches per piece to get the number of circles needed. This picture shows it top to bottom at 7" and left to right at 3.5. I oriented my quilt diffrently. It was about 12 hexes across and I think 20 rows long.

 

While this quilt was simpler than traditional quilts, it had fewer steps, it did not take less time. I stitched 3 lines around each hexagon, 1 to secure the center hex, and 2 more evenly spaced to hold the layers together. That took time but once the quilt was machine pieced togeher it was done, no more steps other than the binding. I did not use batting and the quilt is surprisingly warm for having no additinal layers. There is no backing fabric or batting in this quilt. I would not use it during winter in a very cold climate, but it is a nice Summer weight, or late Spring, early Fall weight quilt. I am now wishing I had taken pictures during the process but I didn't and it has been used quite a lot since it was finished, so I will have to make a new one if I want pictures of the process. 

Kerrie Reed wrote
on 2 Dec 2014 7:34 AM

I made this quilt in King size, I was able to get about 6 large hexagons from a yard of 45" fabric, I made the small hexes from scraps, so for a King size it took, 40 yards of 45" fabric. I used both hand dyed, and commercial prints for my quilt, so on the hand dyes I bought 90" fabric and was able to get about 12 from each yard. The large circles were 14" and they made an approximate 7" finished hexagon. I used 240 large and small hexagons for the entire quilt and about 1 yard of 2.5" strips for the binding. I cut my edges straight and used the cut off bits from each side to fill in the holes on the other. I found it very easy to hand stitch the small circles while watching tv and then pressing them in large batches, but the large hexagons needed to be pressed as I went, after each layer folded up I pressed it down and that was easier for me. I did the math to size it up and down to the differnt bad sizes, it was not much difference in fabric usag and number of hexagons between the sizes. For the left to right it sized about 7 inches per piece, and up and down it had to be measured at about 3.5 inches per piece to get the number of circles needed. This picture shows it top to bottom at 7" and left to right at 3.5. I oriented my quilt diffrently. It was about 12 hexes across and I think 20 rows long.

 

While this quilt was simpler than traditional quilts, it had fewer steps, it did not take less time. I stitched 3 lines around each hexagon, 1 to secure the center hex, and 2 more evenly spaced to hold the layers together. That took time but once the quilt was machine pieced togeher it was done, no more steps other than the binding. I did not use batting and the quilt is surprisingly warm for having no additinal layers. There is no backing fabric or batting in this quilt. I would not use it during winter in a very cold climate, but it is a nice Summer weight, or late Spring, early Fall weight quilt. I am now wishing I had taken pictures during the process but I didn't and it has been used quite a lot since it was finished, so I will have to make a new one if I want pictures of the process.