Fabric Painting & Dyeing

Painting on fabric and fabric dyeing are two ways to create your own fabric colors and designs. Learn how to paint on fabric including fabric stamping, marbling fabric, painting with dyes and fabric paint. Dyeing fabric techniques include shibori dyeing, batik dyeing with soy wax, low water immersion dyeing, and resist dyeing techniques.

Embellish Fusibles with Color and Texture

Fusibles aren’t just for appliqué! Stop hiding your fusible interfacing and web between your fabrics. Let your fusibles take center stage by learning to create complex and unique fabric embellishments for your fiber art with tips and tricks from Susan Purney Mark. My contact with fusibles has been admittedly limited–like many quilters, I use it…

Sun Printing Indoors with Lisa Chin

Did you know you can create a sun print inside on an overcast day? Neither did I! It turns out the heat of the sun–not necessarily light it emits–is responsible for creating the print on fabric. While it’s most fun for surface designers of all ages to watch the bright sunlight change their fabric, you can easily bring this process indoors during the cold and cloudy months as long as you have a warm place and some time on your hands.

Free templates: Create the Look for Old World Tiles by Desiree Habicht

In the October/November 2015 issue, Desiree Habicht wrote about her fabric painting technique for created a beautiful “old world” looking quilt inspired by her travels in Italy. Click below for full-size templates to create your own version of her quilt, “Italian Countryside Tiles,” plus additional painting tips from Desiree. Habicht_Landscape_Templates_QA77 Other topics you may enjoy:No…

itajime shibori resist dyeing dubrawsky

Itajime Shibori Dyeing: How it Works

Itajime shibori dyeing is making a comeback, and for good reason. The ancient Japanese technique of sandwiching a piece of folded fabric between two hard objects (such as the traditional option of wood or the current choice of Plexiglas) and then soaking it in a dye bath, results in strongly patterned fabric with high graphic…

painting on fabric

Create the Look of Old World Tiles with Fabric Painting

A couple of years ago we remodeled our kitchen, including a herringbone patterned tile backsplash that inspired me to make patchwork pillows in the same design. I thought of that recently when editing the October/November 2015 issue of Quilting Arts. In it, Desiree Habicht describes a fabric painting technique using acrylic ink, painted fusible, and…

painting on fabric

Create the Look of Old World Tiles with Fabric Painting

A couple of years ago we remodeled our kitchen, including a herringbone patterned tile backsplash.  That backsplash inspired me to make patchwork pillows in the same design. I thought of that recently when editing the October/November 2015 issue of Quilting Arts. In it, Desiree Habicht describes a fabric painting technique using acrylic ink, painted fusible,…

Silk Rods

Here’s an example of what a silk rod looks like, also shown are silk cocoons. What are silk rods? Silk rods (known as silk carrier rods) are a byproduct of the process of winding silk from cocoons during the first stage of silk yarn production. The rods are about 4″ to 5″ long and resemble…

Thread Painting

This beautiful work by Anne Eckley was featured in the “Thread Painting” article from Quilting Arts Magazine Winter 2003. Simply put thread painting is using a sewing machine like a paintbrush; free-motion stitching images and designs. It’s such a simple process — all it requires is a sewing machine, fabric or canvas, thread, and patience.…

Itajime Shibori Dyeing Made Easy

Itajime is a form of shibori dyeing that uses clamped shapes to create the resist. Traditionally, the cloth was compressed between two pieces of wood held in place with string before starting the fabric dyeing process. These days, shapes are generally made from acrylic or Plexiglas and are gripped with C-clamps. The shapes prevent the…

Tips for Smudge-Free Printing on Fabric

Thermofax screens have a mystery about them, probably because you can’t just buy them in any store. You have to have a Thermofax machine (an old photocopy technology) or know someone who does. Fortunately, there are many artists who will make these screens for you at a reasonable cost. And once you have your screens,…