21 thoughts on “Pojagi Seam Technique with Vivika Hansen DeNegre

  1. Wow, I did not know this was an ancient Korean technique, as it is how my mom taught me to finish many kinds of seams in men’s shirts and some jeans/pants and other garments. I use this seam method when I sew my husband’s shirts, except for the armhole, which I do sort of “backwards, using my sleeve arm, and it looks so nice inside! My mother was an excellent tailor and preferred this over a true french seam, I can’t wait to try it on a table runner I have just started cutting out!! I would never, ever have thought of this for scarves and art quilts and etc in a zillion years!!! Thanks, lovely work you do!!!

  2. Thank you for that fabulous idea and I learnt to do this in high school ….many years ago and couldn’t remember how to do it but now I do. Thanks heaps :)

  3. My grandmother used this technique, never knew it was’t original to Appalacha -smile-. Seems to me, my Home Ec teacher also taught this method.   Thank you.

  4. This was inspiring, makes me want to get out my machine and start some projects I have been putting off, using this method to finish the seams. Thank you for this video. 

  5. Dear okydoky,

    The video is working fine. (I just tested it.) You may want to check that your internet connection/modem is strong enough (sometimes when I try to play videos at home I have trouble, because I need to update my modem). Try watching the video from another location (perhaps your local library). It’s well worth it!

    Best,

  6. Thanks so much for the video Vivika!  I saw someone demonstrate this in Houston and it is so nice to have the method somewhere where I can review it again and again.

  7. The seam iin the video is actually called a False Flat Felled Seam, I believe. A true Flat Felled Seam is stitched with the wrong sides together and the fold over is done on the front side. It was commonly used on dungarees, but good for lots of items where you don’t want unfinished edges (before seam finishing machines got so popular). In Home Ec, in the ’50’s, I learned to do it by stitching the raw edges even first and then trimming off one side of the allowance before folding over – that prevents a change in the overall size of the piece. French Seams are great for sheer fabrics. At any rate, this idea looks like fun when done with Asian style fabrics.

  8. A French Seam is a different animal. It is used to hide a seam inside another seam. The first seam is stitched with the wrong sides together and the second is done from the wrong side, hiding the first allowance. Both are narrow, and very good for thin fabrics on garments where a finished look is attractive, like a peignor or nightgown. I still use it a lot.

  9. A French Seam is a different animal. It is used to hide a seam inside another seam. The first seam is stitched with the wrong sides together and the second is done from the wrong side, hiding the first allowance. Both are narrow, and very good for thin fabrics on garments where a finished look is attractive, like a peignor or nightgown. I still use it a lot.

  10. Vivica,
    What you just showed is in fact, a flat-felled seam. You have a Bernina machine — did you know that Bernina makes 2 feet especially for flat-fell seams? Numbers 70 & 71 (for different seam widths). You might want to try them.

  11. I learned the flat fell seam as a child and recently used it for making some flags as I wanted them to look neat from both sides.  It’s aways interesting to see how other cultures develop the same things in parallel. 

  12. When I pin this to my techniques board on Pinterest, the visual has so little to do with the content of the video and it’s not very attractive either. neither is helpful to me finding it on my board or making it attractive for others to pin from me.  Perhaps you might rethink your advertising vs. content balance.  In understand you have to do it but you’be thrown out the baby with the bathwater here!

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